Our Latest Posts

How to get relief from period pain

How to get relief from period pain


What is menstruation?


Everyone (adolescent boys and girls) who is about to enter puberty (the process of body changes that cause a child’s body to become an adult body capable of reproduction) should be taught or know the basic medical definition of menstruation and that it is a normal process that females go through as their bodies prepare themselves for a potential pregnancy. Menstruation, also known as a period or monthly, is the regular discharge of blood and mucosal tissue (known as menses) from the inner lining of the uterus through the vagina.

When in life do periods start and stop?


The first period usually begins between twelve and fifteen years of age, a point in time known as menarche. However, periods may occasionally start as young as eight years old and still be considered normal. The average age of the first period is generally later in the developing world, and earlier in the developed world. The typical length of time between the first day of one period and the first day of the next is 21 to 45 days in young women, and 21 to 31 days in adults (an average of 28 days). Bleeding usually lasts around 2 to 7 days. Menstruation stops occurring after menopause, which usually occurs between 45 and 55 years of age. Periods also stop during pregnancy and typically do not resume during the initial months of breastfeeding.

Besides bleeding from the vagina you may have

  • Abdominal or pelvic cramping pain lower back pain
  • Bloating and sore breasts
  • Food cravings
  • Mood swings and irritability
  • Headache and fatigue

Up to 80% of women report having some symptoms prior to menstruation. Common signs and symptoms include acne, tender breasts, bloating, feeling tired, irritability, and mood changes. These may interfere with normal life, therefore qualifying as premenstrual syndrome, in 20 to 30% of women. In 3 to 8%, symptoms are severe.

A lack of periods, known as amenorrhea, is when periods do not occur by age 15 or have not occurred in 90 days. Other problems with the menstrual cycle include painful periods and abnormal bleeding such as bleeding between periods or heavy bleeding. Menstruation in other animals occurs in primates (apes and monkeys).

The menstrual cycle occurs due to the rise and fall of hormones. This cycle results in the thickening of the lining of the uterus, and the growth of an egg, (which is required for pregnancy). The egg is released from an ovary around day fourteen in the cycle; the thickened lining of the uterus provides nutrients to an embryo after implantation. If pregnancy does not occur, the lining is released in what is known as menstruation.

Sexual activity is safe or not during Periods.

Sexual intercourse during menstruation does not cause damage in and of itself, but the woman's body is more vulnerable during this time. Vaginal pH is higher and thus less acidic than normal, the cervix is lower in its position, the cervical opening is more dilated, and the uterine endometrial lining is absent, thus allowing organisms direct access to the bloodstream through the numerous blood vessels that nourish the uterus. All these conditions increase the chance of infection during menstruation.

Pain management in the monthly menstrual cycle.


The most common treatment for menstrual cramps is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs can be used to reduce moderate to severe pain, and all appear similar. About 1 in 5 women do not respond to NSAIDs and require alternative therapy, such as simple analgesics or heat pads. Other medications for pain management include aspirin or paracetamol and combined oral contraceptives. Although combined oral contraceptives may be used, there is insufficient evidence for the efficacy of intrauterine progestogens.

Menstrual Cycle.


The menstrual cycle is the hormonal process a woman’s body goes through each month to prepare for a possible pregnancy. Regular menstrual periods in the years between puberty and menopause are usually a sign that your body is working normally. Irregular or heavy, painful periods are not normal. Many women also get premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms. You can take steps at home and talk to your doctor or nurse about ways to treat your period problems and PMS.

What Is Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)?


Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is when a girl has mood and body changes before or during her period. It's usually at its worst during the 4 days before a period. PMS usually goes away 2 to 3 days after the period begins.

What Are the Signs & Symptoms of PMS?

  • sadness
  • mood swings
  • crankiness
  • anxiety
  • tiredness
  • food cravings
  • pimples
  • bloating
  • backaches
  • sore breasts
  • headaches
  • constipation
  • diarrhea

What Can Help if I Have PMS?

You can try these things if you have PMS symptoms:
  • To help with food cravings: Eat a balanced diet with lots of fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • To ease bloating: Lower salt in your diet.
  • To ease crankiness or anxiety: Avoid caffeine and get plenty of exercises.
  • To help with backache, headache, or sore breasts: Try a warm heating pad or acetaminophen (Tylenol or store brand), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, or store brand), or naproxen (Aleve or store brand).
  • To relax: Try yoga or meditation.
  • To prevent and treat pimples: Work with a dermatologist (skin doctor).

What is the treatment for pain and other symptoms caused by menstruation?

Treatment for the causes of menstrual pain depends on what the cause is, and may include birth control pills, heavy or prolonged periods, IUDs, noninflammatory steroid drugs (NSAIDs), for example, ibuprofen (Advil, ), aspirin, naproxen (Aleve), and other-the-counter pain (OTC) medications to relieve pain and cramping.

What are pads, tampons, period underwear, and menstrual cups?

Pads, tampons, period underwear, and cups let you go about your normal life during your period, without getting blood on your clothes or sheets. Tampons and cups go inside your vagina, pads are worn in your underwear, and you can wear period underwear instead of regular underwear on the days you have your period.

Pads:(sometimes called sanitary pads) are narrow pieces of material that you stick to your underwear. Some have “wings” or flaps that fold over the sides of your underwear to protect against leaks and stains. Some pads are made out of disposable materials — you use them once and throw them away. Other pads are made from fabric and can be washed and reused.

Tampons: Tampons are little plugs made of cotton that fit inside your vagina and soak up menstrual blood. Some tampons come with an applicator that helps you put in the tampon. Tampons have a string attached to the end, so you can easily pull them out.

Period underwear: Period panties are just like regular underwear, except they have extra layers of fabric that absorb your menstrual blood during your period. There are different kinds of period underwear for light, medium, or heavy flow days. You can wear period panties on their own, or with a tampon or menstrual cup.

Menstrual cups: Menstrual cups are shaped like little bells or bowls, and they’re made of rubber, silicone, or soft plastic. You wear the cup inside your vagina, and it collects menstrual blood. Most cups are reusable you just empty them when you need to, wash them, and use them again. Other cups are disposable you throw them away after one use or one period cycle.

Tampons and cups can’t get stuck, get lost inside you, or move to another part of your body. The muscles in your vagina hold them in place (without you even knowing!), and they stay inside your body until you take them out. Most people can’t feel tampons or cups at all when they’re in the right spot. You can wear tampons and cups in the water and during all kinds of sports and activities.

See your doctor about your period if:

  • You have not started menstruating by the age of 15.
  • You have not started menstruating within 3 years after breast growth began, or if breasts haven't started to grow by age 13.
  • Your period suddenly stops for more than 90 days.
  • Your periods become very irregular after having had regular, monthly cycles.
  • Your period occurs more often than every 21 days or less often than every 35 days.
  • You are bleeding for more than 7 days.
  • You are bleeding more heavily than usual or using more than 1 pad or tampon every 1 to 2 hours.
  • You bleed between periods.
  • You have severe pain during your period.
  • You suddenly get a fever and feel sick after using tampons.

Treatment in Ayurveda.


You can use a mixture and use two tablespoons three times a day.
  • Nagkesar churna.
  • Satavar churna .
  • Gloe.
  • Sisam ke patte.
  • Ashokarist.
  • Female redson

1 Comments